The Iraqi Election: A Step Towards Reform or a Re-affirmation of the Status Quo?

This policy outlook seeks to analyse the possible impact of the Iraqi election results on the prospects of meaningful political reform in the country.

Iraq’s electoral commission announced last week the final results of the country’s October 10 parliamentary elections, confirming Shia cleric Muqtada al-Sadr as the biggest winner in the vote after securing 73 out of parliament’s 329 seats. Sadr’s main political rivals, the pro-Iran Fatah alliance, secured only 17 seats, prompting the group led by militia leader Hadi al-Amiri to allege voter fraud. Fatah was joined by other pro-Iran parties in forming a united front called the Coordination Framework. They are not only contesting the election results but are also calling on Sadr to join them in forming a ‘consensus government’. Such a move, were it to materialize, would enrage the pro-reform Tishreen movement who called for early elections in the first place. This policy outlook seeks to analyse the possible impact of the Iraqi election results on the prospects of meaningful political reform in the country.

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